FEATURES

Ending on a "Make"...

 

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By Ruth Brennan Morrey (ruthbrennanmorrey.com)

 

On a typical day, my small-framed, tenaciously competitive 8-year-old son, Finn, spends his time playing hard, getting dirty, and competing as though he is in a professional combine at the Joyner household with his two best friends, Kai and Ryk. With no organized structure, it marvelously resembles old school play. Starting to play is easy. For up to 8 hours in one day, whether it’s football, basketball, hockey, or soccer, they love battling, they love keeping score, and they LOVE each other. It is a beautiful little friendship.

 

Finishing play is another issue.

 

“Finn! It’s time to go!”

 

“Just wait! I have to end on a make! C’mon Mom-pleeeasssse let me end on a make!”

 

“Ending On a Make”—a basket, a touchdown, a goal—has become a compulsion for these little boys. To appease this healthy ritual, I smile, observe, wait, and wait longer, until gradually I become impatient when Finn is having an off day, or the opposing 7-year-old goalie is producing a Saturday afternoon highlight film.  I allow him his “make” and finally, we head home....

Three Things...Including Composting....

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By Erin Klegstad (sweetsweatlife.com)

 

March was in like a lion – complete with a few inches of fresh snow – and it definitely didn’t go out like a lamb (feels like 4F this morning… ugh). Extended forecast temps in the 30s?! C’mon, Minnesnowta! So over winter and everything that comes with it (long down jackets, hats, boots, the cold…).  

As for training this month, a couple blips – including bombing a bike test and taking a week completely off from running. My left ankle started bugging me during a long-ish run, starting from my Achilles and moving to my posterior tib tendon. So after chatting with my coach, we agreed to shut it down for a few days. It worked, too. And a week later, it felt good as new. Lesson learned: Always listen to your body and don’t be afraid of taking some time off. 

Four things this month because I couldn’t narrow it down to three! 

1 – organizing iPhone pics  

You guys, there are 6,300 photos on my iPhone, dating back not even two years (to July 2016). How does that happen?! Digital is how it happens – it makes it far too easy to snap 17 versions of the same thing. (Side note: remember the thrill of getting a roll of film...

Stuff You Shouldn't Say to a Triathlete...

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By Lisa Dolbear (ironman.com)

 

Oh, October. That wonderful time of the year when most triathletes begin the off season and take some time to rest and do something other than swim, bike or run. Chances are, your arms and legs aren’t the only things that are tired—if you’ve been on the multisport scene for any length of time, you’re also likely tired of hearing the peanut gallery chime in with some of these common questions and declarations. Here's how to respond. Just remember to be nice.

 

1. "All you ever do is work out, don't you have a life?"

Why yes, I do. Nothing makes me MORE alive than bringing back childhood through swimming, biking and running while enhancing them with the competitive spirit.

 

2. "I could do a tri, I just don't have the time."

News flash: We don't have the time either, but we've found a way to carve it out of our busy lives because that's what you do when you commit to something important to you. Thirty-five year old mother of two, part-time MBA student, community volunteer, fitness instructor and full-time marketing professional Darcy DiBiase is no stranger to busy schedules. She’s also no stranger to triathlon. "I learned how to own my world at 5:30 a.m., and use the time before everyone else’s day started to do things for myself," the three-time Iron Girl finisher says. "And time is only one of the resources I needed to be successful—I’ve also found the right people along the way to keep me motivated and committed to my goals."  ...

Mitchell's 2017 Report Card...

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ED. The MTN Guys are big fans of Mitchell Clayton, a fine young man from an awesome family who also happened to win the Minnesota Junior of the Year award in 2015. We are also big fans of his tri blog. Over the next few weeks we'll be sharing three of his posts, starting with his reflections on his 2017 season. Enjoy.

 

By Mitchell Clayton (mitchellclaytontriblog.wordpress.com)

(Posted October 14, 2017)

It’s about time I evaluate this past season, it’s mid-October for Pete’s sake! The 2017 multisport season was different than all of my other past seasons, in both positive and negative ways. So, I think I will just give some holistic and general reflections and then give race-specific reflections…

  • I started training A LOT later than I would have liked to.  School was very busy for me all last year, and this took away nearly all the time that I would have liked to devote to swimming, biking, and running.  I started my planned, structured, and actually legitimate training on June 4th.
  • Because I started training late, I didn’t start racing until July 8th.  In a typical season, I would have had 4 races or so under my belt heading into July....

Full Effort...

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By Denton Ketels (Magazine.grinnell.edu)
 
Madeleine Pesch ’16 likes to joke that she would never have found Grinnell if it weren’t for the “amazing pool” she first saw in a swimming-and-diving brochure. She went on to record plenty of stellar accomplishments in the Russell K. Osgood pool during her four years, but the double major in chemistry and gender, women’s, and sexuality studies (GWSS) meant taking academics just as seriously. Pesch’s balanced effort won her both the Honor G Scholastic Award and the President’s Medal, which is presented annually to the senior who exemplifies the ideal Grinnell student in terms of scholarship, leadership, poise, maturity, responsibility, and service....

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