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Breakouts & Breakdowns...

sara_c_elite.pngTOUGHMAN HALF - Sean Cooley is a balls-to-the-wall racer. He wants to win every race he enters and is willing to bust his hump to make that happen. Sometimes it works, like it did at Lake Waconia, where he took down the men's course record. And sometimes it doesn't, like at Minneapolis where he hammered the bike so hard he paid dearly on the run. Still, he managed a 2nd place finish behind a dude--Matt "Pain Train" Payne-- who hasn't been beaten by a fellow Minnesotan since 2012 and is a perennial USAT AOY HM.

At Toughman in Chisago City last Sunday, Dr. Cooley once again let it all hang out during the bike portion. Despite the headwind on the return portion, he kept his head down and cranked furiously until the end. By that time his leg muscles had turned to oatmeal. The four-minute lead over eventual winner, that pesky Payne, dwindled quickly.

Matt, who wasn't feeling too spunky either, took the lead before the five mile mark of the run.

Oatmeal Legs fought valiantly the rest of the way, but eventually had to settle for 4th. He was overtaken by the event's amateur race record holder, Tim Hola, and Kris Spoth, who raced because last weekend's ca-ca weather cheated him out of a successful 70.3 experience in Racine....

Blank & Heiney....

Heiney_speech.pngTOUGHMAN SPRINT - The wetsuitless swim may have added minutes to the times of those doing the half IM, but it appeared to have had little impact on the sprinters, who only had to swim 400 meters.

 

Nicole Heininger (photo) successfully defended her 2015 title by leading from the get-go. Her small gap after the swim grew to an insurmountable one after the 22-mile bike portion. Though Diane Hankee, who has 28 career multisport wins and has been racing like a banshee in 2016, outran Heiney by more than a 30-seconds a mile over the closing 5K, it wasn't nearly enough to close the gap. Diane's 1:23:00 would rank as the 5th fastest women's time in the 11-year history of the sprint--only pros Heather Lendway (twice) and Lauren Goss, and now Nicole Heininger--had gone faster.

Soul Food & Newsy Stuff...

Bertram_Blast_Final_Small_thumb.pngBERTRAM BLAST - (ED. Apologies in advance for inflicting our inner hippie on our readers.)

After almost three decades of growth and prosperity, the sport of Triathlon peaked. Race directors didn't see this coming (2010-2011), however, and many new races were were added to the calendar at that time.

Here in Minnesota, almost 30 new events came into being during that period. The result of that (and other factors), of course, was the dramatic reduction in event attendance in the years that followed....

Sick on Race Week?

sick_guy.pngBy Dr. Jordan Metzl (triathlon.competitor.com)

If you get sick during race week, don’t panic. Most illnesses are viral, last 48 to 72 hours, and will hopefully resolve by race day. I tell my athlete patients that a fever less than 101 degrees or any infection above the neck is safe to race with. There are times, however, when you must step away from the start line. When you’re really sick—with a temperature greater than 101, chills and weakness—racing can be dangerous....

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