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Trials & Triumphs...

plans.gifBy Ruth Brennan Morrey (ruthbrennanmorrey.com)

My last training update was in January. Its now April. Much has happened since then, so its time for an update! This post includes two parts: two trials and a triumph. Trial #1 is posted today, while trial #2 (Monterrey 70.3) and THE Brazil 70.3 podium triumph will be posted on Tuesday.  I’ve been fired, I’ve been sick, and I have performed.  This post highlights a sudden change in coaching leadership, the concept of resiliency, and how adversity has challenged my process.

Real Resilience

As many know, I have a PhD in Counseling Psychology, with a minor in Health Psychology. The concept of resilience has always been exceptionally intriguing to me. In fact, resilience and hope was the precise topic of my dissertation. During my academic training, I worked in a rehabilitation unit and helped patients cope with life threatening illnesses, spinal cord injuries, amputations, strokes, and other...

Sophomore Success Stories...

emy-pets.gifIn 2010, first-year triathletes Dan Hedgecock and Claire Bootsma were outshined by fellow ROY nominees Jenny Shaughnessy and Sam Janicki. The MTN Guys did not predict that Hedge and Claire would achieve stardom in their sophomore seasons. In 2011, they were their respective gender's Triathletes of the Year. Hedge even earned a USAT AOY HM. Boots was considered for the same honor as well, but did not make the final cut. Claire did however end Cathy Yndestad's four-year reign atop Team Minnesota.

In 2003, CY was nominated for ROY. We did not foresee her winning the Most Improved award the next year, but she did.

Similarly, we did not predict Heather Lendway's mercurial ascension from MN Rookie of the Year in 2012 to arguably the the best female amateur triathlete that America has ever produced in just a year's time. In her first three seasons, ...

Jorgensen Wins Again. US Rocks...

gold-coast-podium.gifBy Liz Hichens (triathlon.competitor.com)

American Gwen Jorgensen earned her eighth-straight (and 11th overall) World Triathlon Series victory today in Gold Coast, Australia. She was joined by two fellow Americans on the podium, with Sarah True and Katie Zaferes finishing second and third, respectively.

Jorgensen, True and Zaferes all came out of the 1.5K swim as part of the lead group. A front pack made up of eight athletes was formed, with all three of the Americans showing strong form all the way to T2. Once on the run, it quickly became apparent that Jorgensen would again run away with the victory. There was some short-lived drama as Jorgensen was forced to take a 15-second penalty for allowing her bike to fall while in transition. The penalty didn’t faze the reigning world champion as she was quickly back on the run course, still maintaining a strong lead.

Jorgensen ultimately turned in a 33:35 run to earn the 1:56:59 victory. True was strong throughout the entire run and grabbed the second spot in 1:58:17. Zaferes looked fatigued at times, but she was able to hold on for the final...

Making History...

gwennie-swim.gifCOLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. — On the heels of her 10th career ITU World Triathlon Series victory two weeks ago in Auckland, 2014 ITU World Champion Gwen Jorgensen leads an American contingent of 15 into this weekend’s series stop in Gold Coast, Australia.
 
Competing on a standard 1,500-meter swim, 40-kilometer bike, 10-kilometer run Olympic-distance course, Jorgensen and the elite women are scheduled to race at 9:05 p.m. ET on Friday, April 10 (11:05 a.m. local time in Gold Coast on April 11). The elite men will then race at 12:05 a.m. ET on Saturday, April 11 (2:05 p.m. Gold Coast local time). The races will be broadcast live on triathlonlive.tv, and will air on Universal Sports Network from 2-6 p.m. ET on April 11....

Stuff About Being the Only Triathlete in the Family...

energizer.gifBy Nicole Ekesten (nicolekesten.blogspot.com)

This post was shared on the Challenge Family America's Blog 3 weeks ago but wanted to re-share on my actual blog and add a few things that I couldn't share in my 850 limit :)

Many of us had similar starts to triathlon. We were drawn to the sport because it sounded intriguing, challenging and like something we wanted to accomplish for ourselves. I quickly learned, however, that my involvement in triathlon doesn’t just affect me–it affects my entire family. Endurance sports include more than just a few hours on random weekends; they can be consuming, expensive and sometimes cause a wedge in our relationships. As I enter my seventh year of triathlon, I want to share with you a few mantras I have found to keep myself and my family priorities balanced.

Racing isn’t just about me.


When I first started racing, my family would come with me to every race. We would drive all together, they would watch me set up transition, wait for me at the swim start and cheer throughout the day. It was great to have the support but I really didn’t think about them much and, after a while, they grew tired of supporting. I never considered that waking up at the butt-crack of dawn just to sit around on some camping chairs in a field (or better yet, a parking lot) to see me for a few glimpses over the course of a few hours wasn’t fun!  ...

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