Getting Sick After Races?



By Susan Lacke (triathlete.com)


You’re most vulnerable to falling ill 72 hours post-race. Here’s how to avoid it.

When you crossed that finish line, you had never felt stronger. But less than two days later, you’ve never felt sicker. What gives?

“If you’ve raced and developed an upper respiratory tract infection the following day, you’re not alone,” says Dr. Leah Roberts, emergency room physician and co-founder of SteadyMD. “You’re most vulnerable to getting sick 72 hours post-race.”

When the body is stressed, it produces increased levels of cortisol, a hormone that suppresses many of the body’s defense mechanisms against germs. This happens whether the stress comes in the form of a pressing deadline at work or an argument with a spouse. Race day, however, takes stress to the max...

Why We Tri....


Remember to find your reasons for triathlon and go back to those each time, writes Meredith Atwood.


By Meredith Atwood (triathlete.com)


There’s a sentiment in triathlon that you should work your “weakest” sport the most. Makes sense, I guess—if you aren’t great at something, you should keep practicing to bring it up to proficiency. Sometimes however, that one sport we need to practice really becomes a drag.

Dreading the workout or that leg of the race starts takes the fun out of what we are doing in the first place. We start to think: I hate to run. I hate to ride. I hate to swim. 

Sort of begs the question: why are we doing this sport? If we are saying those words, what are we doing? If we hate any part of it, why do we keep showing up? Sure, there’s a testament to our commitment and our speed and our amazing discipline.

But are there valid reasons to keep coming back to something when we say things like, “I hate to run” over and over again? Perhaps....

Family Support....



By Mike Buenting (from Facebook)


This morning while rocking my bike workout. I watched a documentary about Western States 100 mile trail run/race. The athletes featured in it talked about their family, their children and how they do this stuff to inspire and motivate their kids.


How they could not chase these crazy goals without the amazing support of family and friends around them. Then I started to reflect on how much my time training and racing with Bella means to me! and how I crave moments like the one in the photo where we hug at the finish line. And how Bella and I could not do any of this without the support of the amazing SW (Shannon Waggoner)! She is the brains and glue of this crazy family operation that makes it all go.



2018 is here and Bella and I have a lot of lofty goals! And I can't wait to share so many moments like this with her as it's what makes me smile and keep on going everyday!  ...

Being Better...



By Erin Ladendorf (bikesandcatsrightmeow.blogspot.com)

Here we are. Late January. The time of year that every triathlete dreads. (Or maybe its just me. But I have a feeling I am not alone in this thought.)

It's freezing cold out. The days feel like they are 5 hours long. And getting into a pool at 5 am feels like what I would imagine walking the Green Mile to certain death feels like. However instead of lethal injection, it's set of 100s, 200s, and enough kick sets to make your hips pop out of their sockets. Plus running outside is like a really sick game of "don't slip on ice and break your face" every time you step out the door. So that is challenging in it's own right.

However I probably shouldn't complain. After Ironman I took an Epic trip to Costa Rica as a reward for all my hard work. And let me tell you, some days I really think I could have stayed there forever. It also turns out that surfing is great cross training for triathlon! I found that the vacation was a much needed mental break after the intense stress of 2017, and it set me up to tackle 2018 with a clear mind and open heart. Plus, I learned how to open a coconut with a machete, so that's pretty cool too....

How You Should Train in the Offseason...



By Matt Dixon (UsaTriathlon.org)

In “Fast-Track Triathlete,” elite triathlon coach Matt Dixon offers his plan of attack for high performance in long-course triathlon — without sacrificing work or life. Developed for busy professionals with demanding schedules, Dixon’s program makes your PR possible in IRONMAN, IRONMAN 70.3, Rev3, and Challenge triathlon in just seven to 10 hours a week.

In the book, Matt Dixon offers an overview of his top priorities and goals for each phase of the year: the offseason, the pre-season and race preparation. His book offers training schedules and key workouts for each phase. Let’s take a look at how Dixon recommends triathletes training during their offseason.

Postseason Phase: The Offseason

The true “start” of your season comes on the heels of a break at the end of the prior season. The postseason phase can be 4 to 12 weeks, depending on your experience level, when your previous season finished, and your race plans for the upcoming season. You should not be at full training capacity during the postseason. Even if compressed in time, your training load should be nowhere near your max. In addition, you can enjoy a degree of flexibility in this phase. Although hitting every intensity during every week and phase of the year is important, it is all about how much intensity. In these weeks, you will do very little threshold work and will not have event-specific focus....

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