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A Spate of Indoor Tris...

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LIFE TIME FITNESS INDOOR TRIATHLONS - Do nine things constitute a "plethora?" Probably not.

Perhaps "spate" is a better word. The term refers to things that a substantial, though not necessarily plethoric.

We digress.

On January 8 there was a spate of indoor tris, which were staged at various Life Time Fitness clubs around the Twin Cities. They all consisted of a 10-minute pool swim, followed by 30-minutes on a spin bike and 20-minutes on a treadmill. The events were social and basically low key. Part of what makes them so cool is that you could ride alongside slower bikers, but not pass them. Or run next to faster runners, and not be passed by them.

Here are a few race capsules:  ...

2016 Prize Money Leaderboard...

walter-white-money.pngBy Triathlete.com

USA Triathlon debuted its prize money leaderboard last summer, letting the cash curious track top athlete earnings. It also shows which races have the biggest payouts (ITU’s overall rankings prize of $755,000 tops the chart, with the Ironman World Championship coming in second at $650,000 and the Island House Invitational coming in third at $500,000).

The leaderboard has its limits. The bonuses earned from Olympic medals aren’t included, and there don’t appear to be any XTERRA...

Relighting the Fire....

az_biker.pngBy Trainingpeaks.com

Time out from sport is more common than many of us might imagine. Breaks from training happen for all different reasons: injury, fatigue and burnout are perhaps the more obvious. Just as often though I've known athletes to have enforced breaks due to pressures such as work, divorce, depression or, alternatively, happy life events such as having a baby or even getting married. Over the years I've had the enormous pleasure of helping many athletes restart their sporting journey. Here are a few proven strategies for getting going and reigniting your motivation for endurance training....

Breaking the Sugar Habit...

sugar.pngBy Matthew Kadey, MS, RD (triathlete.com)

Life is sweet, all right—so sweet that the average American now eats about 129 pounds of caloric sweeteners each year, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture. While a dedicated triathlete can get away with consuming a bit more sugar than a couch potato, it’s still a good idea to limit intake for overall better health and performance; a diet high in the sweet stuff is linked to everything from weight gain to diabetes to recovery-impairing inflammation. Plus, high-sugar foods may crowd out other more nutritious options that can better fuel workouts and help repair muscles. But the ubiquitousness of added sweeteners hidden in our food supply can make it a challenge to scale back. Presenting 10 tactics to make your diet a little less saccharine....

7 For 17...

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By Erin Klegstad (sweetsweatlife.com)

And, with this post, week one of my month of writing is done. It’s getting easier every day as I let go of it being perfect and instead focus on getting it done – no easy task for someone who’s type A!  ...

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